CHT Conference 2017

Have you spent two years waiting for something and then suddenly it’s here and gone? That’s how I feel about the conference this past weekend. Two years of seeing the planning and helping in a small way, and it is all gone and past so quickly.

I think one of the fun things with a conference is seeing others responses. I watched as a new member realized we got goodie bags and what wonderful things came in them donated by vendors and guilds. Yes, these bags are worth a bit on their own.

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My goodie bag haul along with table favors and door prize

The last conference I took a picture with all my accumulations in one shot. Alas this year was a bit much for that. So above is some quite practical goodies along with some just wonderful creations with woven fabrics, felting, and dyeing. The bag of fiber is a silk and baby camel mix that I received as a door prize from Red Fish. I got their door prize at the Austin conference as well. Such lovely fiber they turn out. I talked with the gal and learned a bit about spinning this particular blend. It will be dreamy and will need a special project. I could say something about each item, but for space I won’t, but I do enjoy looking at all these items here.

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Class items and money spent

Now for the picture of what came home with me otherwise. I do highly recommend if you are a spinner or lover of touch, watch where you stick your hand. Now I like black and white and grey and seeing some fiber with such coloring, I went over and touched it. (Don’t you love an obsession that vendors want you to touch because … well follow on.) I stuck my hand in a tub full of wonderful softness. Touching clouds of silk and merino. Such loveliness that, yes, it didn’t take two seconds to look at the price and say, “I’ll take three ounces of that.” Then while waiting, yes, there was a tub of some brown lusciousness. Mistake again. I stuck my hand in it. It was Yak and silk. Lord have mercy (aren’t we thankful He is merciful), I added an ounce of that to my order. So have three new bags of wondrous spinning fiber when I didn’t mean to bring any home. As per weaving fiber, I also bought some more navy blue and natural cotton for a project that will need more.

Now I might add that I only used my egg money (plus some demonstration money) for any spending while at the conference. Don’t you love having chickens and people who will buy eggs and then you get to be old fashion and use your egg money to buy what you would love to have.

The color card and color-aid sheets were from a class that was great in the sense that, yes, I had heard a bit of it before, but actually messing with colors hands on was a revelation in many ways. I was amazed at what happened and want to actually do all the exercises over again. Great mind blowing day on Saturday. Also got to play with embroidery ideas for textiles on Friday. That was fun to experiment outside the box as I do quite stay in a box there. Many of us in the class had done needlework in our distant pasts and all agreed that dipping our fingers in again made us want to delve back in on our own created textiles.

Now if ever I wanted a raffle basket it was this year. Tall Pines was the guild I began my fiber journey in, and I have several friends there. We gathered at this conference and roomed together, ate together, gad-abouted together. It was great seeing them again. They put together a basket to dream about. It had a log cabin theme and was full of foods as well as log cabin woven textiles of different types. I wanted that basket. Alas, when the name was called it went to Jane. It stayed in the group but not to me. It was a bit disheartening. Alas afterwards as we were getting to see it all together, Jane shared the wealth as there were things in it she couldn’t eat or was gracious enough to share. So she gave me the three small cones of cotton as well as some whole wheat flour that missed the picture. The small log cabin bag was one she had woven for the basket so she gave it to me as well. I loved the way the pattern looked in it. I love log cabin and all of its various variations. Could you just weave it the rest of your life and never repeat a pattern?

Now I went this whole conference without taking pictures. Never thought to take a single one until after the fashion show, and I wanted a picture of us all together. So asked Marian if she would snap it and here we are after a wonderful day and evening. Thanks, Marian, for a great picture.

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So here is the Friday to Sunday Tall Pines contingent who hung out together at the conference.

Categories: Fiber, Fiber Arts, Weaving | Tags: | 4 Comments

Bent Oak Flock

I have not reported to myself in awhile. Not that anything has not been happening around here. But the biggest news, I want to record here and remember. I am collecting Gulf Coast Native sheep. We are up to eleven now.

I wrote about James and John joining us here on the farm.They weren’t named yet and that took some time to find the right names, but a friend suggested the Apostles as a naming scheme and as the bottle babies were twins, I decided that James and John would work great. The day they arrived how tiny and helpless they were.

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James & John on the ride home. So tiny.

Then came the call of another orphan baby girl. Of course, we would jump in the truck and head to Bryan (an hour away) at 9pm on a Sunday night to pick her up. She was without a mother probably most of the day and didn’t have anything to eat. So warm bottle in the truck, we headed out and went and picked up my little precious one. My sweetheart. My heartbeat. My warm hug, My warm kiss. My …. In case, you can’t guess I love my Sarah. I named her Sarah in hopes that she will one day be the mother of a little nation of lambs.

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Sarah’s first night. She got to stay in the house as it as cold out.

Then I found two more boys to add the farm. Mark went to pick them up one day and brought them back getting home just after dark. They were not sure they were happy at all with a new home and new people. Especially, not being around people too much. But they soon made friends with James and John and since they came together they became Peter and Andrew.

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Peter, Andrew, James, and John

So we were up to five lambs and Mark was out checking on lambs ready to go to new homes. He was bitten by the bug. Now I was already in line to get more from where the orphans all came, but Mark decided we needed twelve. Who was I to argue? So not long after we were headed to another farm to pick out four girls to bring back. That was an adventure of running my hand through lots of wooly backs and picking the softest ones. Yes, my husband may be thinking leg of lamb sounds good but his wife though loving lamb as well was mainly thinking in terms of wool. So four more girls came home with us. They were named continuing on from Sarah to Isaac and Jacob’s wives. Then added Hannah in for good measure.

I might add that at this point, he also made a cage to fit in the back of the truck for hauling lambs and about anything else that will fit.

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Rebekah, Leah, Rachel, and Hannah in back

Exciting we were up to nine lambs now. Then, it was finally a good day to go and pick up two more girls from the farm where I got the bottle babies from. So east we headed again and what lovely girls we picked up. They are the oldest of all we have as they were born in December so larger, more self assured, and just downright lovely to look upon. Alas though, this must be becoming too common as I do not have a first day picture of them. Why didn’t I?

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Naomi and Ruth. Really thought I had great pictures of them but must go try again.

So now there are eleven and one more to come. We have a ram reserved until he is weaned. Then one more trip to pick up a baby and we will be set … for now. They are so much fun. “They” say chickens are the gateway animal to a farm, and though I do love my chickens would affirm that statement, lambs are the heartbeat of my farm. I still love my eggs but oh, to sit out with lambs is a far greater joy.

I did just check and do not have a picture of all eleven together. Guess it is time to head out again with the camera. Aren’t we thankful for digital cameras today. I’d hate to know how much film I would be using up right now or how many awesome shots I would have missed by not just snapping all the time.

I am working on good pictures of each one for the sole purpose of learning their individual characteristics so that when someone asks who is who, I don’t have to check ear tags to remember. Not all have them have tags, but boy I am glad the ones that do have them. Thankfully, they are the ones that look the most alike.

Categories: Bent Oak Farm, Fiber, Gulf Coast Native Sheep | Tags: , , | 1 Comment

The Dog is Off

I am usually very conscious of what tools and items I am using cost. I really don’t like to waste anything. Alas, it has been ages since I posted about what was on the loom. I just checked, now I feel really bad. It is better to not look at dates, I posted about this project in September of 2016. Has it been on the loom that long. No wonder not much has been done. I checked that link and there was one before in MAY for starting this. Can I cry over this.

This warp should have been just cut off at some point, but I couldn’t see wasting all that yarn. So on it went once in awhile. I knew I should just cut it off but couldn’t.

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Notice a problem here?

Then this showed up. I wound more on the center two inches than any other of the inches. Well, I just thought I would weave up close and then cut the edges and still weave the center into just a narrow strip. But… the outside bouts broke and came loose. Wasn’t easy to redo and have tension so just dropped them. But after a bit that was the end of my patience with this warp and the scissors came out, and I cut every last one of those inches off. I probably should have done it sooner. But it is done now.

I threw it in the wash and then laid it out to dry and still not pleased with the project, but I was going to go ahead and give a shot at its original purpose and see if it would still work.

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Still not happy but washed.

So all seems ok. Did notice that one of the reds in the thin lines puffed up a bit and shrunk a bit different than the rest of the yarns. Nice little variation to the overall look. Nice chance addition to this cloth. Oops. Did I say something nice about this piece?

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Where did that come from?

But I won’t let that last long. Today I went in and discovered this down the backside. I was finally half pleased to weave this as a 3-1 twill so the stripes showed well on the front and then most of the white was on the back. So though this doesn’t show on the front it has more than a bit of a befuddling about it. There is yellow all about. Actually, just down the two lines. Splatterly. I never noticed it before, and I don’t see it in the above picture. A mystery to add to the misery of this piece. What happened? Not fun to discover on a day of things going south fast. Actually, I did finally start to half laugh today. You can’t have all that happened and just cry.

So anyway the piece is off the loom and I have planned a new project that should be more fun. Just have to order a bunch of yarn. With all I have, I need more.

Now I feel the need to remind myself that this hasn’t been all the fiber I worked on in its time. I have been spinning with my Golding spindle. I also received some yarn at the guild Christmas party. I wove them up on the Zoom Loom and am trying to crochet them together into a vest. Alas, not real happy with it either. Sewed some thrum scarves. So there are other things happening.

But still – YELLOW?!?! I don’t even like yellow. As in I don’t like yellow. My first thought was that the Boys (now named James and John) got in and did the deed. Alas, despite their knack to get to whatever they want, I doubt they’d have gotten up there without destroying the world around them in the process. By that sentence, I guess we all know they have made it into the house on a few occasions. We need a large place, not a pasture size space yet, to contain them now, but alas it is still the backyard and so yes, we have learned that our back door doesn’t latch. Who knew? Not that they get in on their own but they do follow Sam and Mattie inside.

Categories: Fiber, Weaving | Tags: | 1 Comment

I’m Joining My Ancestors

I come from a long line of farmers. From about any angle as you travel back in my personal history there are farmers. Did I say I come from farming stock? There were a few who didn’t get the memo that they were suppose to be farmers but considering most of my ancestry has been in the States since the 1700s and before and didn’t live in cities, the given is that they were the farmers that they were.

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Last summer in my little world

Now I live on my own little piece of land and we are building our own little world on it. I often consider what I have and what they had and the agriculture census’ from the 19th century are interesting to compare what we each have. Of course, they had more land than we do, and had crops that we don’t, but I do like seeing where we cross over and this week I even added to our similarities.

Looking at the 1850 agriculture census for Jasper County, Illinois – horses, milch cows, other cattle, sheep, swine are the common animals. With some oxen thrown in here and there. Well, we own one horse and have our third foster looking for a forever home. We don’t have a milch cow, and I believe that would be too much milk even for me to make and use in butter, cheese, etc. The other cattle is taken care of. We have the five heifers still and hopefully four will go to market soon and one will be in the freezer. I doubt the swine will ever come into play but you never know.

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First page of an 1870 agricultural census entry for Hidalgo, Crooked Creek, Jasper County, Illinois

The early agriculture census didn’t include chickens but by the 1880 agriculture census poultry is included as well as how many eggs you got by the dozen over the last year. And yes, everyone has their poultry. So I can claim to have joined the poultry crowd. I’m sure the earlier dates they all had them as well but for some reason whoever set up the categories of the agricultural census didn’t think they were important. I wonder if they were so ubiquitous that it would be easier to see who didn’t have a dozen chickens than who did.

But did you notice that I missed one of the animals up above? My 3 great grandfather John Cummins had 18 of them in 1850, 7 in 1860. Eliphaz Brooks had 14 in 1850. James Carr had 22 in 1870. Reuben Carr had 43 in 1860 and 25 in 1870. Montraville Washington Utley had 10 in 1870 (and yes that was a common name in the family and I wonder where it came from) 10 in 1870. And lastly Jonathan Cowger had 10 in 1870.

So last Saturday evening I got a message from a friend that has Gulf Coast Native Sheep and she had twin boys whose mother had died. Did I want to take on two bottle babies? Can you guess how long it took for my heart to start racing and going ballistic at the possibility?

After talking with Mark and lots of messages back and forth, I went and picked up two sweet boys to add to the farm.

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All packed up to head to our new home

We made the run on Monday to pick them up and they have been so much fun. Quite entertaining and boy do they love feeding time.

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It is a lovely day

Now they have a whole new world to explore, and I get to join my ancestors who also had sheep. Can’t wait to see what the future holds. And the poor boys are still waiting on names. Their new mother is very particular about names and so they are still just The Boys.

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What is this?

Categories: Bent Oak Farm, Fiber | Tags: | 4 Comments

Darning Good Socks

I have three pair of good thick wool socks, and yes, my feet get cold even in a Central Texas winter. I love my thick wool socks. Alas, I wear them all over and it doesn’t take long for heels to wear out. Now these three pair of socks I just couldn’t get rid of so I decided that I must learn to darn socks. So to YouTube I went and found out that it is quite basic and not much to it but practice.

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Getting started

So the first lesson I learned in the practice of darning is that if you are going to darn socks it is best to do it before holes get too large. The above sock was the smallest of my holes to fill. Small is easier. But anyway,off we went with each individual sock. I picked some of my early handspun yarn that was lacking much. It seemed a good dimension though.

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Warp finished

Now one is to weave back and forth till you have a warp to then weave through with the weft. I did learn that it would be better to try and get the threads closer together but then also I need to use better yarn the next time.

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One sock done

Alas, it looks sad but I finished this green one with one piece of yarn that didn’t come apart once in the pulling of it. It is not remotely really good but I can wear the sock and as soon as it wears out again we will know how to fix it better the next time.

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Completed

See that missed thread above. Yep, a bit to learn and practice at this yet. But it totally does its job so whose complaining. And they look so much better once turned right side out again.

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Two pair and do you see the mistake?

Time passed as I worked on 5 of the socks and got to thinking to well of what as happening. When I finished the sixth one and took the lightbulb out of it (yes, I went old fashion for a round object inside or at least twentieth century old fashion), I realized I had forgotten to turn it inside out first. YIKES! Doing them inside out hides so much when it is actually worn. So I have one reminder of how not to do it but it still will work. Will just have to correct it when it wears out again. The third pair missed the above picture as they were already on my feet. I can tell the heel isn’t quite the same as the rest of the sock, but it is covered and has been warm since it was completed on a cold night. I am happy.

It seems I have found several uses of late for all that badly spun, learning to spin, fiber yarn, from the beginning years of learning to spin that I still have sitting around here. Need a few more projects but I am pleased with this one and will be darning socks from now on. Will check on some cotton ones next.

Categories: Fiber, Fiber Arts, Sewing, Spinning | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

The Rooster May Crow, but the Hen Lays the Egg

Ok, so my chickens are making possible liars of me on Facebook. I have hence decided that the story needed a larger platform, and just for the memories here is what has happened over the last three days.

Yes, I was on normal afternoon chores when glancing in the coop, I suddenly realized there was something in a nesting box that wasn’t there before. Went to open the boxes and sure enough we had our “first” egg.

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“First” egg?

 

We were excited. I even posted this picture on Facebook. OUR FIRST EGG!!! Actually wasn’t expecting any till at least another month. See these girls are only 6 months old and, yes, that is when they should start laying but winter is a slow season for eggs and not wanting to rush them, we didn’t do any of the “keep those eggs coming” tricks.

Next day I glance in the coop and thought a girl had popped an egg while on the roost and it had fallen and broken as it looked like half a shell on the floor. But when I reached in, lo and behold, it actually was a shell-less egg. Read about them but so cool to actually hold one.

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Shelled egg left, shell-less right

So got a picture of the two eggs together. Ever so happy. We are on our way. Our first two eggs. What joy! I may not have to buy any more in a very short time.

Then. After shopping today. Mark calls. I was on my way home. Did I know there was a nest in the barn and there are seven eggs in it? WHAT??!!?? Yes, the girls had fixed themselves up with the preferred nesting area and were busy laying eggs in the barn. They had quite a nice nest. All private in a corner. Full of eggs.

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Behind the old tractor

They actually had done a good job of it for a bunch of girls without mothers to show them the way. Amazing how God put in them the innate ability to do their job. Of course, having mothers to help is better, but thankful they don’t have to have a mother nearby. These twelve girls are figuring life out together.

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A nest of 7 eggs of both types of chickens

Then to top the afternoon off, Mark did check the nesting boxes again on our way back to the house and there was another egg. For a total haul of eight today.

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Today’s gathering

So the question remains. What was our first egg? The one I posted so happily, proudly on Facebook? Or one of these seven found in the barn. I haven’t the slightest idea. I guess I don’t know if I ate the first one for breakfast this morning or not. I do know that it was good, and I am sure that these will be good as well. Anyway, we may have to have an omelet here. I did come home with an 18 pack of eggs from shopping.

So to see you out here is a close up of some of the Twelve.

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The pretty girls

Categories: Bent Oak Farm | Tags: | 2 Comments

Two Projects

I did get a hat woven off loom style that actually fits my head. Not only that, it was a bit big. So I’ve crocheted on it and it still is a mite big but works. May still do another single crochet round taking in again but it is good for stuffing all my hair in when going out to do chores.

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Wearing the hat

My usual hat model refused to model a hat again. Did get a picture of Mattie laying down with it on but can’t find it now. So here I am wearing my hat. For as little as I could enlarge the pattern I have to think it has to do with the alpaca that it came large this time.

Also recently at the guild Christmas party, we learned to make Dragon Boats. Of course, I had a bit of getting it going but once I got it, it was rather fun winding it and seeing it grow and cover the whole model without having to change a thing you were doing. I absolutely love the yarn I used. Still need to make a proper hanger for it, but here it is.

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Not perfect but pretty

Oh, and a big plus to today. As I was coming back in after chores I checked the coop, and we have our first egg. Totally wasn’t expecting it so a very nice surprise.

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One of the girls was busy

 

Categories: Bent Oak Farm, Fiber, Weaving | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Homestead Faire 2016

One of my favorite places, nearby, to visit is Homestead Heritage. It is just north of Waco and they demonstrate and sell so many of what many today consider old fashion crafts and a way of living that is closer to nature. Each year on the Friday and Saturday after Thanksgiving they have a faire and demonstrate more than any one person can see in a day. Plus have lots for sale. You only pay for a parking pass to get in (cheaper bought ahead of time online) and then you can attend all the seminars, workshops, and demonstrations for free though there are quite a few things that you can pay to do and lots of food and items to buy.

Last year we went on a most miserable day. As in cold, rainy really miserable. They actually for the first time repeated the event the following weekend because the first one was quite so miserable. This year I headed north by myself to attend and stay as long as I wanted. I drove through a gully washer getting there and prayed that the weather app was right and things would be very clear by noon.

One place I always check out is the weaving and spinning booth in the craft barn to see what is for sale and drool heavily. This year I was caught by the potholders. Remember making them as a child? Well, they have come a long way with different sizes of looms. I have always loved color and weave patterns and the array of different patterns in them was a wonder to look through. There were two different places with them so lots to see. Made me want to dig out my loom and cut up some socks and try some of the patterns.

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The tags have the name of the young person who made them and their age

I also got a quick look at a sheepdog working hard. Actually, I was hurrying between seminars so didn’t stay long but it was interesting for a short moment.

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Picture taken at a distance so not real sharp.

I also watched a flax demonstration. They have gotten flax to grow and a young gal had some that she then showed the processes that are involved with making linen thread. She used the retted flax and showed simply the steps to turn it into thread and had a bag to show the end process. The funny bit at this was the people that were interested in it and knew nothing so were asking some good questions and learning. I didn’t learn anything new, though enjoyed seeing the different color of the flax between pond and dew retted.

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Flax that has been dew retted and pond retted. If I remember right the cream colored is the pond retted.

I also got to watch rope being made with sisal, again if I remember right it was an 80 foot long station here. I wanted to jump in and take over a bit of the discussion as the guy doing it knew how to make rope, but couldn’t tell why the twist stayed or what was really going on with it. I enjoy watching rope making as the principles are the same as spinning and yes, I do understand the magic of the twist and what is happening. Guess some minds just want to know more of why of what they are doing and what is happening.

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Still setting up the sisal before the twisting starts happening.

One of my favorite demonstrations was the apple press. I actually learned a bit there that was quite interesting and since my favorite snack was some hot apple cider and apple cider donut (SOOOOOO yummy) it was fun to watch it happen.

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Young boy turning handle breaking up apples. Young man pressing apples with cider running into a bucket behind the trash can.

I listened and took notes in seminars on sustainable gardening, alternative energy, chickens, and planning a homestead. Loved the day despite rain in morning and so very cold all day. Would love to go back today but need to get things done here instead. So of course, I’m sitting here typing instead of working. OK, off to work now.

 

Categories: Fiber, Spinning, Weaving | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

Learning to Spin

Yes, I learned to spin a few years ago. Have you noticed that learning to spin and mastering all it has takes more than a few years? I feel like I could be spinning the rest of my life and still feel like a beginner.

But what does one do with all those beginning spinning yarns? Most are just small bits. Just a few ounces of fluff that you turned into a semblance of yarn. So they continued to accumulate in baskets and on shelves and soon you wonder what will happen to them. Something needs to happen.

Then one day you are looking at your Zoom Loom and realize you have the perfect tool for using up little bits of homespun. So you start weaving away and start gathering lots of little squares of all colors. What next?

Mine went into a cape. I laid them out in different patterns on the floor, many different times, and eventually came up with a pattern for the back that worked well with what I had so far. (Picture long gone but did take one for when I started putting it together when I had a pattern I liked.) Then started down the front. Alas, as this was a work in progress and depended on what was spun it ended up with a not so evenly pattern on front, but then that is kind of what kind of project this was. What was at hand is what went into it. So the best of the early learning to spin yarn became a new cape.

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The back

The original back idea, that was approved by me, got shortened by a row because of wanting more for the front of certain colors. I now wish I hadn’t changed that and had kept the original back pattern. Alas too late for that change. I am not taking it apart to change anything! I do still like its symmetry. I even remember many of those yarns and their spinning. Some from the very beginning and some further down in time. I do like the thick squares best for looks despite the fact they are so hard to weave the last couple of rows.

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The front

Of course after such a nice pattern on the back I was left with leftovers for the front. There is more of a pattern from the top coming down that then somewhat goes its own way and did its own thing. I don’t dislike it but looking at it on a small scale in a picture, I see where I would now switch some of the squares around and place them in different spots.

I will say though that some of those squares are really nice and some aren’t so very nice. Still blaming it on that early learning curve. The wonder is that I can see where I’ve been and where I’m at now in spinning.

That is quite a fancyish crochet border around it. Two rows done on the same level one in front of the other.  I think this border would look much nicer in a very thin crochet thread on something nice a bit delicate. But it does give it the bulk it needs for what it is.

So Learning to Spin is complete and I do still have several bits of early spinning that is cream colored in a basket. They all look really sad compared to these. Need to dye them and find something to do with them now.

I did post a bit on this project while still not finished at Then and Now Spinning.

 

Categories: Fiber, Weaving | Tags: , , , , | 2 Comments

A Hat Declared Done Revisited

I have discovered the pictures that I knew I had taken when I went to record my hat that I wove at A Hat Declared Done. I knew I had them. I hunted all over this computer but to no avail. Then yesterday I realized I had several pictures still on my phone that went that far back. Alas, my computer and phone refuse to communicate right now. Two problems have developed because of this and are driving me crazy trying to figure out but… I can email the pictures to me and have done that this morning, so now I want to show how the hat was done. The pictures aren’t great but at least I have a record.

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The pattern for the warp

First you take this pattern and enlarge it to fit your head. Alas, I’ve known for some time that I have a large head. I can’t wear my husband’s hats. Hmmm… I would have never guessed but I have had a time enlarging this just right. But here went another try and from the pattern side you can see that the underpart is warped. The dotted lines show where the warp goes on the backside of this.

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Started weaving

Once it is all warped then you start weaving. It is going around and around until you have it packed to please you. Now do not look too close at this because I didn’t realize it at the time that I had caught some of the threads and guess what? Yes, one should just tear it all apart if you do that. Guess how I know? Yes, I worked with it since I was already going, but without details, it can be bad and a lot more work when done.

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Top of hat finished weaving

So here I am done with weaving, so now to turn the poster board over and start on the shorter brim area to weave it.

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Weaving the underside of the beret.

Once you have the top packed to please you, then you turn it over and do the same with the underside of the beret. You can see here that I found that the long needle from my Zoom Loom works great for weaving as you can pick up quite a few warp threads at a time.

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Sam gets to appear again. Love this picture.

So here it is done again and sitting on my ever patient with mom, Sam. I really would love to find the book I got this idea out of again. It was an off loom weaving book and I wish I had it again.

Oh and by the way, I have another hat, woven with my handspun alpaca, downstairs just washed and drying. Guess what? It is way too big for this head this time. Guess I will crochet another round on it again and try to tighten it up. Should I give up matching this head. I have had four misses now. I wonder if some of it is the fiber. As I didn’t enlarge it very much between these two.

 

Categories: Fiber, Weaving | Tags: | 1 Comment

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