Xang 34 – Don’t You Love the Name

I wove my corded petticoat and still had quite a bit of warp left on the loom so I went hunting a pattern and settled on Xang 34 in Helene Bress’s The Coverlet Book. I do love looking at this 2 book set and there is a star pattern I love but alas and alack it is for 8 shafts and I only have 4 so had to settle on the lesser star pattern labelled Xang 34.

When you see the draft from a distance, you can’t see (or maybe I should say, I can’t see) the star pattern at all but rather these squarish boxes. but up close a nice star sits in the midst of those boxes.

But anyway, I rethreaded the heddles and started weaving. Oh, did I say the rethreading went really south and gave me tons of troubles? I almost gave up before it even began. But anyway, I was finally weaving and it wasn’t going well so cut it off and started over again. Selvedges were to drive crazy through this whole project.

The start that wasn't great so cut off.

The start that wasn’t great so cut off.

So back at it again and going by the pattern, the number of picks it was asking for gave me very elongated stars.

The loooong stars

The loooong stars

So I decided that I would use fewer picks for the weft. I then had to finished one repeat of the stars and wove some plain weave and then could start over again with 2 less picks in each block.

Squared up stars

Squared up stars

So it seemed to look better and off we went again weaving and hoping my notes were good for finishing off the border the same on both ends. Then I had a great thought after this went over the breast beam and took the camera under there and took a picture of the beginning border which in the end was the best way I had to get the borders to look the same. Yeah, for belated thoughts that help!

Well, I eventually hit the end of the repeat without enough to do another but still some more warp left so gathered up my leftovers to just weave plain weave with color. I have wound off the ends of bobbins onto cut cardboard from hangers and stored them for some time (no, I don’t through very much away) And now I just started putting these onto the shuttles and started weaving. Alas, this really shows some of the troubles I was having with this warp all along with this project but as my thoughts were on cutting this part up, I didn’t sweat that it wasn’t perfect. So I just imagined what these colors were forming and in my head it was a field of wildflowers with trees above and the sky and at the bottom reflection in water.

My color and weave plain weave with leftovers.

My color and weave plain weave with leftovers.

Boy it really shows troubles by this time that were getting worse with this warp.

Anyway, it is cut off the loom washed and pressed and now to decide what it will all become as I don’t really think it is quite good enough for my first idea.

The squared piece and you can see part of the border.

The squared piece and you can see part of the border.

The bit with the long stars

The bit with the long stars

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Categories: Fiber, Weaving | Tags: , , | 2 Comments

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2 thoughts on “Xang 34 – Don’t You Love the Name

  1. Julia, I often have a bit of warp left after a project and use these pieces as bread towels, hand towels, or table mats. By using these pieces in my own kitchen, I can see how well the fabric wears and change things up if it doesn’t hold up well. I have a few bread towels from warps I wove 20 years ago and they make me smile.

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  2. The towels I use in the kitchen are all ones I’ve woven. Some had definite troubles so never left the house. Some have minor troubles but I love them all.

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