When Hay Needs Moved

Now this was my diary of my fiber pursuits but sometimes you just have to keep a pictorial memory of other things. This is one of those “whatever else crosses my mind” that needs a record.

So we have moved to the country and 12 acres. This summer we had the hay fields cut (that sounds like a large area but really isn’t) and then had 5 big round bales sitting out there waiting to be moved somewhere. Now, I am wanting to attempt a no till garden come spring which means preparing the area now. Not that we have it all right yet, but yesterday afternoon Mark wanted to run to Tractor Supply for a bit to help move a bale. We got back and the job began.

Arriving on the scene

Arriving on the scene

After we got home, I changed from summery skirt to sturdy split skirt and headed out to the nearest bale. Mark had the truck and trailer backed up to the bale and was getting the tie ready to wrap around it. Sam and Mattie were very curious at what their crazy masters were up to. Sam stayed close and observed, but Mattie headed back to cooler ground and watched from a distance. When I arrived, we moved the bale and got the yellow tie around it. A large bale (said to weigh 1500 pounds) can be rolled by two people amazingly if little is in the way. So together we did get the tie wrapped around, but then it was too short so Mark had to go get a chain and another tie and we were able to cobble together enough to start.

Starting the cranking and learning not to go too far down or you disengage it.

Starting the cranking and learning not to go too far down or you disengage it.

Cranking became the order of the evening. A job simple enough that I took over for most of it. We learned a bit about using a crank like this. It has a name that more or less is what it does, but I forgot. Something like a Come Here is what it is called. But back to the work. The fun was not looking back for some time and then when I turned around the bale actually was coming up the ramp and onto the trailer. I was moving a huge bale with one hand! So on it went and finally the bale was on the trailer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Almost on the trailer

Almost on the trailer

Look at that! It is just about on the trailer. A wonder when you realize what you are doing without the expensive fancy tools some use. We had an immense feeling of achievement and pictures had to be taken at the time. I snuck one of Mark, who would prefer not to be in any of these, and he got one of me after that was not half bad.

 

 

 

 

I will admit a bit of pride at this moment.

I will admit a bit of pride at this moment.

Here I am by our proud achievement. Though this turned out to be the easy part of an evenings bit of work. You see, we needed to take this to the backyard and get it inside the fence and then take it all apart.

 

 

 

 

Off the trailer and in the yard. See how long that shadow is getting.

Off the trailer and in the yard. See how long that shadow is getting.

Now we got the bale to the fenced backyard and had to get it in there and over to where the garden is going to be. It was pretty easy to roll it off the trailer. Gravity can be a great friend at times. Though the next step was a bit more as we needed it to turn a corner. With bits of working off of each side and using a board to change how it rolled, we managed to get it to turn. I’m sure geometry terms would describe this better but alas do you want to hear how I passed geometry? Yeah, this brain doesn’t work that way, but I understood why Mark tried what he did to help us get it to turn, and we succeeded in the end.

 

 

Time is unknown but alas from the sun in the first picture to this one, quite a bit of time has passed and a job done.

Time is unknown but alas from the sun in the first picture to this one, quite a bit of time has passed and a job done.

So what was it like outside by the time we got that bail tore apart? So very after dark. The sun and any of its remnants of light were long gone and the moon shining bright through the tree. I was covered in hay, sweat, and general ick. I am not a general ick sort of girl, but I got it done (yes, Mark left me to it for a time but then came back and helped me finish) and finally got in for a shower. Did a shower ever feel better or was more earned?

Oh, and a lesson learned. I have always respected that ranchers and farmers dress the way they do, for the job they do, for a specific reason. If you ask me if you can wear shorts and a tank top to work out here, I may laugh in your face. But this shirt I have on was a no no. Lots of hay down the front inside the shirt and my arms we covered in scrapes and just plain dirt. Brown when I went in. You can bet your little blue booties that when we move the other 4 bales I will have a long sleeve button up shirt on. I have a flannel shirt that will probably go to work then.

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Categories: Bent Oak Farm, Tidbits | Tags: , | 2 Comments

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2 thoughts on “When Hay Needs Moved

  1. Was the crank called a “come-along”? That phrase jumped into my mind but I have no idea if it was accurate… But I think one time in the far distant past we used one of those when erecting a fence….

    Liked by 1 person

    • That sounds like what Mark said! I knew it was something to do with what it did. A handy gizmo but glad that job is done … for this year. Did you notice the formatting? I had to go into the HTML to get it to all line up right. Had two do right, so then did the rest following and adding and subtracting what they did to get the pictures and paragraphs to line up. Took longer than just inserting pictures between paragraphs but more compact.

      Liked by 1 person

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