Weaving Those Squares Together: Part 1

Yesterday I vacuumed the downstairs and upstairs at one time. Anyone, who knows me well, knows I absolutely hate vacuuming. That may be a bit strong, but I really don’t like it and can put it off forever. So needless to say, after such an ambitious workout, I had to sit and weave. So I set about to improve weaving those little squares off the Zoom Loom together while making them.

So to begin with, how about some advice? I know I like things to be really easy. Alas life isn’t easy. But when weaving this long of a piece of yarn at once, you really need to cut it in two. Each should be enough thread to do two of the four layers. (Or maybe you want to do each on its own, but I found that two layers at once did work.) So roughly 4 yards long each. Now what can happen if you don’t?

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My mess!

If you try to weave it all with one long thread, inevitably on that first pass of weaving into the loops of the finished square, you will end up with tangles and thread coming off of the posts. The only good in this is that the yarn has a size large enough that you can see the tangle and pull on the correct thread to undo it. But… Who wants to spend all that time untangling knots and then putting the thread back on the post that it was pulled off. Now I don’t like to waste things, and I wasn’t going to just chuck this, so yes, I untangled the mess, got the thread laying back in its proper path and then worked even more carefully. Alas it still tangled up. So my advice. Cut the length in two. You do need to cut it before starting to weave. This is different than the standard directions for weaving a square where you just take the end of your yarn and lay it in place for the first three layers and then wrap the yarn around the square 5 times and cut the thread. Then you thread it onto your long needle and start weaving it in and out.

So once you have decided to weave using two lengths you will need to join them when almost at the end of the first one. When I was learning to weave on a triangle loom, I became good friends with the Russian Join. I have a tendency to want color changes so needed to find a way to do that with the least knot showing. So it was a happy day when I discovered this method of joining two threads. Here it also works well.

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First yarn woven into itself

Take the end of the yarn you are working with, and using a tapestry needle, weave it back into itself leaving a loop.

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Two pieces of yarn looped together

Next take your second piece of yarn and thread it on the tapestry needle and then thread it through the first loop. After you have them entwined then weave in and out of itself just as you did with the first one.

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My mess!

Now you take your two ends that are short and hanging out and pull them tight. Scrunching up the loop till it disappears. I pull them as tight as I can at first to get it as snug as I can. Then I smooth it back out and make it lay as smooth and as flat as it can. This particular thread does that well.

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Laying flat and ends cut close.

So once you snug it up, then cut those loose ends off close without cutting the wrong piece. It is rather nice how it can blend in to the rest of the weaving and is hardly noticeable.

So there is my first two pieces of advice for going crazy. Since all this will be long, I will start weaving two together tomorrow.

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Categories: Fiber Arts, Weaving | Tags: , , | 1 Comment

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One thought on “Weaving Those Squares Together: Part 1

  1. Pingback: Weaving Those Squares Together: Part 2 | Weaving a History

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